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  Join us for the Blessing of the Animals on the Feast of Saint Francis, October 4th at 4pm on the Great Lawn next to the church at Saint Bernard's.  Bring your children, grandchildren with their pets.

You can now pay your Religious Education Tuition using PayPal !

Our Religious Education Tuition covers most of the program expenses -- St Bernard's Parish subsidizes our program from the weekly collection.
And great news... if you're a regular donor at Saint Bernard's Church (that is if you use the church contribution envelopes, or even better, you contribute online through Faith Direct) and you've contributed at least $200 between April of last year and March of this year, you'll get a discount this year. if you're not sure, see the re-registration form that was mailed to you or call the Religious Ed Office at 516 731-8511.

Remember : After you have made your payment please MAIL  your  re-registration form in with you receipt from PayPal for your registration process to be completed. 

Number of Children Regular Tuition Discount Tuition
1 $195 $100
2 $260 $150
3 or more $370 $175

Click here to pay the regular tuition.

(To qualify for the Faith Direct discount NEXT year, REGISTER HERE.

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Click here if you've qualified for the donor discount:  

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If you are teaching as a catechist in program this year:


Families with children with special needs

  

 

 

Members of our parish building committee check out the plans for the re-purposing of the convent building.

LET'S BUILD FINANCIAL UPDATE

We are continuing our drive to raise a minimum goal of $1.75 million to provide funds to
• move the offices and priests' living quarters to the convent building
• remove the leaking church tower
• build a large lobby
• create new entrances
• renovate the parking lot

So far parishioners and local businesses have pledged: $1,718,778
We have collected $758,827 to date   08/29/11

We also have $600,00 saved from the former capital campaign to be used for the parking lot at the end of the project.

 

 September 2019 • After months of consultation, we have received the final schematic for the renovation and re-purposing of the Convent building from our architects. We've posted the plans below.

NEXT STEPS
• Waiting for approval from the Diocese
• Detailed Drawings to be completed
• Job sent out for bids
• Contractor selected
• Work begins

 

First Floor (Parish Offices)

Second Floor (Priest Residence)

Lower Level (Meeting/Storage/Mechanicals)

 

 

Religious Education is starting soon! Have you registered your child (1st through 8th grades)?

Click here for information and registration.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux’s Story

Man of the century! Woman of the century! You see such terms applied to so many today—“golfer of the century,” “composer of the century,” “right tackle of the century”—that the line no longer has any punch. But Western Europe’s “man of the twelfth century,” without doubt or controversy, had to be Bernard of Clairvaux. Adviser of popes, preacher of the Second Crusade, defender of the faith, healer of a schism, reformer of a monastic Order, Scripture scholar, theologian, and eloquent preacher: any one of these titles would distinguish an ordinary man. Yet Bernard was all of these—and he still retained a burning desire to return to the hidden monastic life of his younger days.

In the year 1111, at the age of 20, Bernard left his home to join the monastic community of Citeaux. His five brothers, two uncles, and some 30 young friends followed him into the monastery. Within four years, a dying community had recovered enough vitality to establish a new house in the nearby valley of Wormwoods, with Bernard as abbot. The zealous young man was quite demanding, though more on himself than others. A slight breakdown of health taught him to be more patient and understanding. The valley was soon renamed Clairvaux, the valley of light.

His ability as arbitrator and counselor became widely known. More and more he was lured away from the monastery to settle long-standing disputes. On several of these occasions, he apparently stepped on some sensitive toes in Rome. Bernard was completely dedicated to the primacy of the Roman See. But to a letter of warning from Rome, he replied that the good fathers in Rome had enough to do to keep the Church in one piece. If any matters arose that warranted their interest, he would be the first to let them know.

Shortly thereafter it was Bernard who intervened in a full-blown schism and settled it in favor of the Roman pontiff against the antipope.

The Holy See prevailed on Bernard to preach the Second Crusade throughout Europe. His eloquence was so overwhelming that a great army was assembled and the success of the crusade seemed assured. The ideals of the men and their leaders, however, were not those of Abbot Bernard, and the project ended as a complete military and moral disaster.

Bernard felt responsible in some way for the degenerative effects of the crusade. This heavy burden possibly hastened his death, which came August 20, 1153.

Source: Franciscan Media